Katherine Johnson

Katherine Johnson was born in 1918. Johnson was a research mathematician, who said herself, was simply fascinated by numbers. By the time she was 10 years old, she was in high school! A truly amazing achievement in an era when school for African-Americans normally stopped at eighth grade. Katherine skipped through grades to graduate from high school at 14, from college at 18.


In 1953, after years as a teacher and later as a stay-at-home mom, she began working for NASA's predecessor, the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics, or NACA. The NACA had taken the unusual step of hiring women for the tedious and precise work of measuring and calculating the results of wind tunnel tests in 1935.  In a time before the electronic computers we know today, these women had the job title of “computer.” During World War II, the NACA expanded this effort to include African-American women. The NACA was so pleased with the results that, unlike many organizations, they kept the women computers at work after the war.

Katherine Johnson found the perfect place to put her extraordinary mathematical skills to work. As a computer, she calculated the trajectory for Alan Shepard, the first American in space. Even after NASA began using electronic computers, John Glenn requested that she personally recheck the calculations made by the new electronic computers before his flight aboard Friendship 7 – the mission on which he became the first American to orbit the Earth. She continued to work at NASA until 1986 combining her math talent with electronic computer skills. Her calculations proved as critical to the success of the Apollo Moon landing program and the start of the Space Shuttle program, as they did to those first steps on the country's journey into space.

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